Full course description

Starts February 9, 2015

The purpose of this four-week learning exchange is to bring together organizations, teachers, students, and community stakeholders to assist elementary and middle school students choose a STEM career pathway by exploring topics and problems surrounding space weather through the lens of NASA's Multiscale Magnetosphere Mission.

Course Objectives

1. To prepare and teach middle school students how to quickly and efficiently monitor progress of an entire solar storm from the time it erupts from the sun and magnetic field. To do this, participants will engage in the following activities.

  • Predict which sunspots may be a source of solar storms and identify this within an online learning platform.
  • Discover when solar storms occur and predict which solar storms will affect Earth in an online learning community.
  • Measure disturbances of Earth’s magnetic field and predict auroras.
  • Identify when aurora viewing is most desirable.
  • Create an object to teach the local community about solar storm weather reports employing a monitoring system already developed.

2. To generate interest among students, teachers, and stakeholder in STEM careers in relation to solar storms and the study of heliophysics using a real world scenario and event.

3. To assist in the development of STEM elementary and middle school programs via the arts through the construction of a learning artifact or object that can be shared with a wider learning community.

Jennifer Miller

Jennifer Miller

PhD Graduate Student at University of North Texas, Instructional Technologist at Carroll ISD

Jennifer Miller is a curriculum designer and learning technology trainer specializing in STEM K-12 integration initiatives. Jennifer has served as a District Technology Coordinator and Instructional Technologist where she led a 1:1 K-12 initiative in 2010. Jennifer created a STEAM camp curriculum with New Jersey curriculum specialist, Sandra Wozniak. STEAM camp was implemented in 2011, with a research pilot study in rural Texas during the summer of 2012. Jennifer successfully implemented research initiatives to study student attitudes and perspectives during STEAM camp the last three years with the University of North Texas.

After launching the first NASA MMS 3D fabrication K-12 student printing program during the Summer 2012 STEAM camp, the STEAM camp program has been featured at Texas ASCD 2012 and 2013, TCEA 2013, SITE 2013, SITE 2014, ISTE 2012, ISTE 2013 and ISTE 2014.

She is a Ph.D. research assistant and student attending the University of North Texas. She has done extensive research in STEM and STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art and Math) education and has been awarded grant funding for her research initiatives. Ms. Miller has taught dual credit and CIS courses in database design in the university setting as a adjunct professor, and is interested in connecting K-12 educators and students across the state via social media platforms. Currently a Ph.D. student, she received a Master of Science degree in Computer Information Systems, a Master Technology Teaching certificate, Texas Principal certificate, TCEA Technology Director Certificate, Technology Applications K-12 Teaching Certificate, and a Business Administration 6-12th teaching certificate. Jennifer provides professional services to various K-12 districts in the U.S. If you are interested in having Jennifer host professional development for your district or perform consulting services please contact her directly.

Sam Graff

Sam Graff

Instructor

Sam Graff graduated from The University of Oklahoma in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science degree. Sam teaches Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy at Caroll Senior High in Southlake, Texas. Mr. Graff has also taught science and AP Physics courses at Okmulgee High School and Edmond North in Oklahoma. Mr. Graff runs the new Dragon's Observatory in Southlake, Texas, which is part of Carroll Independent School District. Sam Graff also sponsors the Carroll Astronomy Club.