Full course description

Course Date:

Started March 26, 2018

Duration:

Ongoing

Commitment:

2 hrs/week

Requirement:

None

Course Type:

Self-paced

Credential:

None

Description

This course is designed to provide public health professionals with the overarching concepts and critical details about the control of foodborne hazards.

The course aims to answer three overarching questions:

  1. What is the structure of modern livestock production systems, and what systems are in place to reduce the prevalence or transmission of foodborne pathogens?
  2. What characteristics of the foodborne pathogens have enabled them to be persistent causes of foodborne disease?
  3. What mechanisms are in place to interrupt the transmission of foodborne pathogens through the food supply?

Objectives

Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Recall the structure of food animal production systems and the food safety issues that are associated with each production system.
  • Describe the most common zoonotic foodborne diseases with respect to their etiology, epidemiology, relative impact on public health, and specific preventive and control measures.
  • Describe food safety systems and mechanisms that are used to interrupt the transmission of foodborne hazards to people.

Target Audience: Veterinary and medical professionals, high school and university students interested in veterinary medicine, biology, and molecular epidemiology.


Course is offered by The Ohio State University Global One Health Initiative.

Course Instructors

Dr. Greg Habing

Dr. Greg Habing, DVM, MS, PhD

Professor

Dr. Habing is Assistant Professor in the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine at The Ohio State University. His main research interest lies in preharvest food safety epidemiology of Salmonella, antimicrobial resistance in dairy cattle, and dairy cattle production medicine. His research has combined traditional epidemiology and molecular techniques to investigate herd-level risk factors for recovery of Salmonella on dairy farms.